Make chocolate chip scones for breakfast with tips from an SF chef

Every parent has their never-in-a-million-years short list. You know, like when your 5-year-old asks to hang their head out the car window on the freeway or roller skate down San Francisco’s steepest hill. There are a few things that will never be an option. But chocolate for breakfast? That’s a completely reasonable request to this parent. Chocolate has antioxidants, after all.

We’re completely on board — and so is pastry chef Ginger Elizabeth Hahn, who’s offering up a recipe for chocolate chip scones today that’s made up of a few simple ingredients. Hahn knows her way around both chocolate and kids: She’s a mother of three, a Culinary Institute of America alum and owner of San Francisco’s Ginger Elizabeth Chocolates. And she has a few tricks up her sleeve.

First, she says, real scones are made with heavy cream, not butter. Cream produces a tender scone, she says, while butter produces a flaky scone that “is really a biscuit.”

Use bread flour, she says, which has less starch, so it holds its shape better. (Bread flour has more protein than all-purpose, though, so it’s important not to over-mix it.) Freezing the formed scones before baking will help them hold their shape, as well. And don’t skimp on the salt. It amps up flavor.

So go ahead and indulge. A little bit of breakfast chocolate is good for the soul.

Chocolate Chip Scones

Makes 18

Ingredients:

3¾ cups bread flour

1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons baking powder

1¾ teaspoons salt

2/3 cup sugar for the scones, plus extra for sprinkling

1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips or chunks

2½ cups heavy cream for the scones, plus ¼ cup to glaze

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a large mixing bowl, use a spoon to mix together the bread flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and chocolate chunks.

Place 2½ cups cream and the vanilla in the bowl of an electric stand mixer. Add the dry ingredients on top. Fit the mixer with the paddle attachment and mix until just combined. Transfer the dough onto a flat work surface and gently knead the dough, just until it comes together.

Divide dough into 3 parts. Using a 6-inch diameter ring to measure, gently press each dough portion into a puck that is 1-inch high and 6-inches across. Repeat with remaining dough portions. Then cut each puck into 6 sections like a pie.

Distribute cut scones evenly onto two baking sheets. Brush the tops with heavy cream and sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes or until edges are golden brown. Rotate sheet pan halfway through baking. Let cool and serve.

— Recipe courtesy of pastry chef Ginger Elizabeth Hahn